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 Table of Contents  
ORIGINAL ABSTRACT
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 68-69

41. Efficacy of mandibular advancement device in obstructive sleep apnea patients


KGMC

Date of Web Publication30-Nov-2018

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0972-4052.246652

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How to cite this article:
Pooranchand. 41. Efficacy of mandibular advancement device in obstructive sleep apnea patients. J Indian Prosthodont Soc 2018;18, Suppl S2:68-9

How to cite this URL:
Pooranchand. 41. Efficacy of mandibular advancement device in obstructive sleep apnea patients. J Indian Prosthodont Soc [serial online] 2018 [cited 2018 Dec 15];18, Suppl S2:68-9. Available from: http://www.j-ips.org/text.asp?2018/18/6/68/246652



Sound sleep is a physiological need of the body for growth, development and maintenance of overall health. But due to change in life styles, food habits and strenuous working leads to sleep disorder. Obstructive sleep apnea (osa) is a condition wherein there is repetitive and intermittent collapse of the upper airway during sleep. Continuous positive airway pressure (cpap) remains the gold standard treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (osa). However, the high efficacy of cpap is offset by intolerance and poor compliance, which can undermine effectiveness. In recent years, oral appliances have emerged as the leading alternative to cpap. The most commonly used appliances are mandibular advancement devices (mad). The american sleep disorders association defines mad as a device which is introduced into the mouth and modifies the position of the jaw, the tongue and other supporting structures of the upper airway for the treatment of chronic snoring and osa. Studies show that mads are sufficiently effective in mild to moderate cases of osa patients.






 

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