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 Table of Contents  
REVIEW
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 82

25. Computer aided production streams in prosthodontics: a review of current techniques


Mumbai

Date of Web Publication30-Nov-2018

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0972-4052.246697

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How to cite this article:
Sampat S. 25. Computer aided production streams in prosthodontics: a review of current techniques. J Indian Prosthodont Soc 2018;18, Suppl S2:82

How to cite this URL:
Sampat S. 25. Computer aided production streams in prosthodontics: a review of current techniques. J Indian Prosthodont Soc [serial online] 2018 [cited 2018 Dec 19];18, Suppl S2:82. Available from: http://www.j-ips.org/text.asp?2018/18/6/82/246697



Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (cad/cam) have revolutionized dentistry. With the continuous development of computerized engineering technology, digitized medical treatment modalities are becoming an integral approach for prosthodontics, orthodontics, and oral and maxillofacial surgery. This paper will review the existing computer-aided manufacturing streams for oral and maxillofacial prosthodontic treatment. Currently, subtractive milling is the most widely implemented computer-aided manufacturing protocol in dentistry and it has been shown to be a suitable method for fabricating intraoral prostheses. Additive manufacturing is currently an exponentially growing fabrication method and will most likely be used more frequently in dentistry in the future as its accuracy and range of applications develop. In terms of material processing, both techniques introduce material defects. The subtractive methods, however, currently produce more homogenous objects making this method more suitable for the production of intraoral prosthesis that can withstand higher occlusal loads. Additive methods have the advantage of producing large objects, with surface irregularities, undercuts, voids, and hollow morphology that makes them suitable for manufacturing facial prostheses and metal removable partial denture frameworks. Computer-aided manufacturing procedures will indisputably change many aspects of dentistry in the future, particularly in relation to treatment simplicity and production time. It is therefore critical for clinicians and technicians to be familiar with the advantages and disadvantages of computer-aided manufacturing as these procedures continue to develop and become an integrated part of dentistry.






 

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